Christmas Party 2018 for All International Students /Young Adults

This is our first ever  Christmas Day party at Faith ! A 50 plus  Nations -Multi cultural Church in your neighborhood

if you’ve got no plans or feeling bored at home ,The More The Merrier .Please  join us for Christmas party at 12 noon.

It’s a potluck party (if you’re able to contribute).We will play board games  and have a great time together.

We truly welcome all  International Students/Young Adults to be part of it  .A gift exchange of $5 will be appreciated.

See you guys on Christmas day !

Part of Something Bigger

One of the passions of youth – when they surface from their phones or tablets – is that they want to put
their energy into something world changing, meaningful, significant, bigger than they are. Actually, most
of us are familiar with that feeling.
Missionsfest 2018 was another reminder how we are part of something bigger. Hundreds of
organizations set up booths to share what God is doing in his world to remind us of who he is.
Workshops, films and keynote speakers stimulated the faithful to stretch a little further in sharing the
God who transforms and reconciles his creation. It was good to see some of you there volunteering or
exploring all that your eyes and ears could take in.
Jesus is the Lord of the Nations and he is meeting people in every country on this planet as he fulfills his
promise to have men and women from every tribe and tongue and nation gathering around his throne
one day.
On the Saturday morning of Missionsfest representatives of the agencies and churches of the Fellowship
Pacific (100 churches of which we are part of – 500 across Canada) gathered over breakfast and break
out sessions to increase understanding of how greater synergy could be developed between groups. We
are part of something bigger and more amazing every year.
The Fellowship is designed to leverage the collective strengths of its churches and agencies to make a
God honoring impact and to make disciple-makers who make disciple-makers. Baptist Housing (Owner
of Shannon Oaks and Clarendon Court) – an arm of the Fellowship’s ministry to seniors – helped host the
event.
Here are some brief highlights of what your brothers and sisters in Christ are involved in.
W.I.N.G.S (Women in Need Gaining Strength) – opened its third home, started work on a townhome
complex for single moms recovering from trauma, and expanded its ministry of counseling to men who
are attempting to overcome abusive and negative patterns in their marriages. Any men or women from
Faith are now welcomed to access the program at a reasonable cost. Sometimes our personal challenges
are part of something bigger than we are and we need to reach out for help.
CAMP QWANOES – this camp of ours (for 25 years) situated on Vancouver Island took in more kids than
ever this year. They trained 150 youth in their counselor training program. Any youth aged 15-18 can get
special life changing training from highly challenging and competent trainers. The camp is hoping to
build a new dining room which will seat up to 850 youth. For any family at Faith – or a friend of a family
at Faith – there are special scholarships available for those who can’t afford the camp costs. This is an
opportunity to invite some of the unreached community kids to attend for somethings they might hear
no where else.
DID YOU REALLY THINK THAT ALL THE ‘BIGGER THAN US GOD THINGS’ HAPPEN INSIDE OUR FOUR
WALLS?
(more wow ministries tomorrow)

Have you reached that age yet?

There’s something about us that likes to think we’re at an age different than we are. If we’re younger we like to feel and act older. If we’re older we like to think or act younger. Maybe that’s only me and the people around me.

It takes a certain level of maturity to be who you are and to be settled with that. Discipleship and mentoring grow out of that stable foundation. Once you are settled with who you are you can start investing in others.

In our cross-cultural training we were asked the question: “Do you want to be the hero or the hero-maker?” In our team building times we say do you want to be the discipler or the one who creates disciple-makers who make disciple-makers?

The generation after you needs someone who will reach back and encourage them upward on this climb through life. That’s true whether you’re in your twenties or in your eighties. God has given you experiences and wisdom that was meant to be shared and God has created someone who needs to learn what you know.

Have you ever had a mentor – someone who took an interest in who you are and what you’re doing? Someone who listened just a little more and stayed in your corner just a little longer? We all need someone like that and we all need to be someone like that for others.

Regi Campbell, in his book Mentor Like Jesus (pp. 39-40) says “Great mentors know who they are. They get great joy in seeing their wisdom, knowledge, and experience live on to help others… When a person knows who he is, he’s comfortable in any situation. He doesn’t spend energy wondering what the other person is thinking. He can spend all his energy listening and trying to understand.”

Maybe there’s someone in your own family circle who needs a mentor – or maybe not. Maybe God has someone in our own church family ready to glean from your supportive encouragement. I recently watched a senior supporting a single professional over a period of months and the rally of a discouraged heart was obvious to anyone who knew her. Both of the women benefitted from the engagement.

Make this a prayer as you prepare for the next months ahead. Lord, if there’s someone I can encourage and share my life with (in a mentoring way) please set up a divine appointment and a significant conversation so I don’t miss it. Keep me alert and ready to share your heart wherever I am.

Bless you as you pour yourself into the next generations.

Our Big Picture Thinking

Apologist Ravi Zacharias lays it out clearly in his book The Grand Weaver (p. 42) “What the brain is to the body, the mind is to the soul.”

Zacharias notes that what we call faith is “a thing of the mind. If you do not believe that God is in control and has formed you for a purpose, then you will flounder on the high seas of purposelessness, drowning in the currents and drifting further into nothingness.”

He further cites Essayist F. W. Boreham who declares that “faith is actually the mainspring of the universe, the sheet anchor of civilization. It lies at the heart of all negotiations and worldwide relations. All sound finance builds on it. When people clutch their money, thinking they have concrete reality, they are, in fact, clutching to faith. Money, in that sense, has no value without trust. It is all worthless paper without the promises and pledges of other people and systems. The entire financial structure depends on credit, trust, confidence, belief, and faith.”

Losing faith means the potential loss of hope and love. God’s Word has been given to us as a gift to build faith, hope and love in a world which has lost direction and control. It is food for our minds so that our soul gets clear truth in a world which hasn’t quite grasped it.

How is your mind grasping this thought? Does this make sense to you? Do you see the centrality of how we function from a core of faith?

The problem for many of us is that our faith is misplaced. We place our faith in the money Zacharias speaks of, or we place our faith in other people, an accomplishment, a reputation, a dream, or even in our own might, wisdom and intuitiveness. These will all fail us ultimately, but they will give us the illusion of exercising our mind for some kind of god-designed purpose.

How can you live so that you are operating by faith in Jesus and not in some other object? How will you continue to live that way in what you’re facing? May God grant you the discernment you need in this journey.

He sets the lonely in families -II

Psalm 68:6 says “God sets the lonely in families.”

 

The Vancouver Foundation consistently claims that loneliness is one of the biggest challenges for people living in this city. Seniors isolated in their apartments, care homes or rooms are lonely; young moms struggling to raise children are lonely; refugees and immigrants are lonely; leaders are lonely; young professionals fixed to the internet are lonely; people riding in Skytrains and buses are lonely; even some married people shelter behind closed doors in their own loneliness.

It is hard to see loneliness as a part of our churches. We think that if we can get isolated people into groups of people that loneliness will take care of itself. Several people have told me over the years that the hardest thing is to come to a service, to stand in the middle of so many happy people, and feel all alone.

 

The United Kingdom has now appointed a minister of loneliness to deal with the issue among 2 million seniors who are isolated from community – 200,000 admitted they regularly go over a month without speaking to another human being. In our city, it isn’t surprising to see people drive or commute alone, shop alone, eat alone, order coffee alone, watch a movie alone, walk or jog alone, read alone.

 

Local studies say at least one in five of us experience the sadness that comes from social isolation – reaping the impact on our mental, physical, emotional and spiritual well-being. Surprisingly, social media seems partially responsible for the sense of separation and human connection we tend to thrive and flourish on.

 

Connecting to community is essential for our overall health. Being part of a small group where you can share your life, get prayer support, learn with others, enlarge your perspective on God and sense a personal connection with the life stories of others seems to be something God has designed when he made us.

 

When’s the last time you shared a heart connection with someone who really saw you for who you are? When have you taken the time to initiate a contact so you could see someone else for who they are?

Disciples of All Nations? Really ?

Someone has challenged me that they don’t think churches are making disciples anymore. In fact, they don’t think most people calling themselves Christians are really followers of Jesus. They believe there are a lot of deceived people inhabiting churches feeling secure and comfortable without reason.

Real disciples, they say, are making new disciples. They are sharing their life story with others around them; they are studying the word of God as daily soul food; they are praying actively for others by name to be saved; they are engaged in meeting the needs of others around them; they are generous and hospitable and active in using their gifts for the building up of the body of Christ.

Do you know anyone like this? Is this the role of every believer individually or is the role of the church collectively?

Regardless of your response, how are you involved in helping to make disciple makers who make disciple makers? We’re not talking about people who you lead to say a prayer and then live their lives without real transformation. How do you make disciples whose lives start becoming more like Jesus and then share that transformation so others are transformed?

I’m told young adults are leaving the institutional church in droves because the older generations aren’t investing in their spiritual care and development – in other words, they aren’t being discipled.

Is my friend right in saying we don’t make disciples anymore? What can we do about it?